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Universiti Sains Malaysia
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  Snakebite First Aid
 
Snakebite first aid recommendations vary, in part because different snakes have different types of venom. Some have little local effect, but life-threatening systemic effects, in which case containing the venom in the region of the bite (e.g., by pressure immobilization) is highly desirable. Other venoms instigate localized tissue damage around the bitten area, and immobilization may increase the severity of the damage in this area, but also reduce the total area affected; whether this trade-off is desirable remains a point of controversy.

Most first aid guidelines agree on the following:

 
1.
Protect the patient (and others, including yourself) from further bites. While identifying the species is desirable in certain regions, do not risk further bites or delay proper medical treatment by attempting to capture or kill the snake. If the snake has not already fled, carefully remove the patient from the immediate area.
2.
Keep the patient calm. Stress reaction increases blood flow and endangers the patient. Keep people near the patient calm. Panic is infectious and compromises judgment.
3.
Call for help to arrange for transport to the nearest hospital emergency room, where antivenin for snakes common to the area will often be available.
4.
Make sure to keep the bitten limb in a functional position and below the victim's heart level so as to minimize blood returning to the heart and other organs of the body.
5.
Do not give the patient anything to eat or drink. This is especially important with consumable alcohol, a known vasodilator which will speedup the absorption of venom. Do not administer stimulants or pain medications to the victim, unless specifically directed to do so by a physician.
6.
Remove any items or clothing which may constrict the bitten limb if it swells (rings, bracelets, watches, footwear, etc.)
7.
Keep the patient as still as possible.
8.
Do not incise the bitten site.
 
  Database: Common Snakes
   
 
List Of Common Snakes

 Scientific Name

  Trimeresurus purpureomaculatus
 Other Name:mangrove pit viper, mangrove viper, shore pit viper

   
   
 
   
   
   

 
 
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